Should you use Entity Framework for .NET applications?

I have been working on a project which I thought would be simpler than it turned out to be – nothing new there, most software projects are like that.

The project involves upload and download of large files from Azure storage. There is a database as part of the application, nothing too demanding, but requiring some typical CRUD (Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete) functionality. I had to decide how to implement this.

First, a confession. I am comfortable using SQL and my normal approach to a database application is to use ADO.NET DataReaders to read data. They are brilliant; you just send some SQL to the database and back comes the data in a format that is easy to read back in C# code.

When I need to update the data, I use SqlCommand.ExecuteNonQuery which executes arbitrary SQL. It is easy to use parameters and transactions, and I get full control over how many connections are open and so on.

This approach has always worked well for me and I get excellent performance and complete flexibility.

However, when coding in ASP.NET MVC and Visual Studio you are now steered firmly towards Entity Framework (EF), Microsoft’s object-relational mapping library. You can use a code-first approach. Simply create a C# class for the object you want to store, and EF handles all the drudgery of creating tables and building SQL queries, letting you concentrate on the unique features of your application.

In addition, you can right-click in the Solution Explorer, choose Add Controller, and a wizard will generate all the code for listing, creating, editing and deleting those objects.

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Well, that is the idea, and it does work, but I soon ran into issues that made me wonder if I had made the right decision.

One of the issues is what happens when you change your mind. Maybe that field should be an Int rather than a String. Maybe you need a second phone number field. Maybe you need to create new tables. How do you keep the database in synch with your classes?

This is called Code First Migrations and involves running commands that work out how the database needs to change and generates code to update it. It’s clever stuff, but the downside is that I now have a bunch of generated classes and a generated _MigrationHistory table which I did not need before. In addition, something when slightly wrong in my case and I ended up having to comment out some of the generated code in order to make the migration work.

At this point EF is creating work for me, rather than saving it.

Another issue I encountered was puzzling out how to do stuff beyond the most trivial. How do you replace an HTML edit box with a dropdown list? How do you exclude fields from being saved when you call dbContext.SaveChanges? What is the correct way to retrieve and modify data in pure code, without data binding?

I am not the first to have questions. I came across this documentation: an article promisingly entitled How to: Add, Modify, and Delete Objects which tells you nothing of value. Spot how many found it helpful:

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