Common misconceptions about Rich Internet Applications

Ryan Stewart blogs about Why do tech journalists get Rich Internet Applications so wrong.

I don’t agree with everything he says, especially this one:

AIR is a difficult thing to grasp because running web apps on the desktop hasn’t been done before.

I suppose there might be a way to define “web apps” that excludes

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Will Windows DRM spoil the BBC iPlayer party?

I am intensely interested in the BBC iPlayer, set to launch on 27 July. It’s a landmark in the convergence of the internet and broadcasting.

This is a convergence I welcome. I missed most of the Glastonbury 2007 broadcasts, but I’ve enjoyed the BBC’s watch and listen page which gives you immediate access to most

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Adobe AIR security concerns

Adobe’s Paul Robertson has a thoughtful response to my complaint about AIR security. The point I made is that any AIR application has the same access to the file system as the user. This includes local SQLite databases as well as other documents. Robertson’s response:

In order for a user to access an AIR application, he

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Don’t buy Open Office

If you happen to search on eBay for Microsoft Office, you will likely notice ads like this offering a good value office suite:

Don’t buy it. Just head over to http://www.openoffice.org/ (more than 3 available) and download for free. Nevertheless, it is an amusing example of the free market at work. Go out looking for

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CodeGear puts 64-bit on the roadmap

CodeGear has updated its Delphi Roadmap. Newly added is Delphi codename “Commodore”, set for Winter 2008, which is to include native 64-bit development. After that the company is promising to focus on multi-core/multi-threaded development.

What else is coming? Delphi “Highlander”, due later this year, is a belated update to Delphi .NET, will support .NET 2.0, and has

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Bringing paper and ebook together

There’s a buzz building about a session at the O’Reilly Tools of Change for Publishing Conference (which looks great, I wish I could have attended) from Manolis Kelaidis on his “blueBook”. Kelaidis is a designer at the Royal College of Art in London. His idea is to bring electronics to the book, rather than making

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SQLite, test-driven development, and the inscrutable SQL standard

I interviewed Dr D Richard Hipp, the main author of SQLite, for the Guardian Newspaper.

Among the things I found interesting is that he attributes the high reliability of his database engine to the extensive test suite included in the code. I’m not sure whether he practices test-driven development as such, but it is a great case

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How Microsoft changed its mind about Office XML standardization

My interview with Microsoft’s XML Architect Jean Paoli back in April was not the first time I had spoken to him. I also talked to him in February 2005. At that time Microsoft had no intention of submitting its Office XML specification to a standards body. I thought it should do so, and asked Paoli

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The version problem of today: browser compatibility

David Berlind reports on a case where 35% of developer time is spent on browser compatibility issues.

It’s a huge problem, though I’m cautious about attaching too much weight to a singe anecdotal report. Of course it’s nothing new. Browser compatibility issues are as old as the Web; it was getting better, until AJAX and

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