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Camera, Flash, Action: review of the LG Viewty

I’ve reviewed LG’s new camera phone here. I found this an interesting device because it has a Flash UI, one that for the most part works very well. It also has an excellent camera. No wi-fi, which is a shame.

The Viewty is bound to be compared to the iPhone, because both have touch screens.

…continue reading Camera, Flash, Action: review of the LG Viewty

Another crack at the online office suite

The creator of Hotmail is having a crack at the online office suite market with Live Documents.

I’ve signed up but not received an invite yet. Of course I’ll take a look, but two things caught my immediate interest:

1. Uses Flash and Flex:

Built using RIA technologies such as Flash and Flex, Live Documents

…continue reading Another crack at the online office suite

.NET history: Smack as well as Cool

Microsoft’s Jason Zander comments on my piece on the early history of ASP.NET:

The CLR was actually built out of the COM+ team as an incubation starting in late 1996.  At first we called it the “Component Object Runtime” or COR.  That’s why several of the unmanaged DLL methods and environment variables in the CLR

…continue reading .NET history: Smack as well as Cool

Microsoft vs Mozilla Javascript wars

My comment is here.

Note this debate is not only about the merits of different versions of Javascript/ECMAScript. It is also about power and responsibility. However you spin it, and however far Adobe and/or Microsoft succeed with Flash/Silverlight/AIR, I think we can agree that the browser has an important role for the foreseeable future. It

…continue reading Microsoft vs Mozilla Javascript wars

Long-term implications of the Kindle

Thought-provoking post by Danny Bradbury:

Is a butt-ugly $400 electronic prison for books going to get America reading again, or cause those kids to suddenly get interested in Thomas Pynchon? Survey says no. If publishers are driven by anything to look at new and innovative ways to deliver content, that problem will be what drives

…continue reading Long-term implications of the Kindle

15m UK bank details lost – but what’s the risk?

The UK is in a panic right now because data containing 15m recipients of child benefit has been lost. It’s a serious incident and the chairman of HM Revenue and Customs has resigned.

Even so, I’m a little confused. I watched TV news over lunch and several identity theft experts came on and warned us

…continue reading 15m UK bank details lost – but what’s the risk?

Is CodeRage the future of tech conferences?

CodeRage 2007 starts next week. It’s a technical conference covering CodeGear’s products, including Dephi, JBuilder, C++ Builder and 3rdRail, the new Ruby on Rails IDE.

The conference is both free and virtual.

A virtual conference is no substitute for human contact. I’ve learnt this paradox over many years: even if the same content is

…continue reading Is CodeRage the future of tech conferences?

How to write secure (and less buggy) code

Thought-provoking paper [PDF] from Daniel J Bernstein, the author of qmail, covering software security and addressing topics such as premature optimization and bug reduction along the way.

In March 1997, I took the unusual step of publicly offering $500 to the first person to publish a verifiable security hole in the latest version of qmail:

…continue reading How to write secure (and less buggy) code

How Akamai Download Manager hides your downloads (VS 2008 downloaders take note)

Yesterday I downloaded the hot new release in the Microsoft development community: Visual Studio 2008.

At least I thought I did. I used the MSDN “Top Downloads” feature, which promises:

… a more direct way to initiate a download of a limited set of selected products

The service uses a plug-in called the Akamai Download

…continue reading How Akamai Download Manager hides your downloads (VS 2008 downloaders take note)

REST vs WS*

The REST vs WS* wars get ever more interesting, with Dare Obasanjo from the Windows Live team announcing (or confirming) his conversion to RESTful ways, and Project Astoria demonstrating that Microsoft is now building REST services into ASP.NET and ADO.NET (see here for further comment).

Microsoft is still committed to WS*, but equally seems to recognize

…continue reading REST vs WS*