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Access Web App: at last a simple web database app builder from Microsoft

One thing hardly mentioned in the press materials for Office 2013, and therefore mostly ignored in the immediate publicity, is Microsoft Access 2013. It is included though, and its most interesting new feature is a thing called an Access Web app.

To make one of these, you click the big “Custom web app” button

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Microsoft SQL Azure versus SQL Server on Amazon AWS

Amazon RDS for Microsoft SQL Server offers cloud instances of SQL Server. Amazon’s offering even supports “License Mobility”, Microsoft jargon that lets volume licensing customers use an existing SQL Server license for an Amazon’s instance. But how does Amazon’s cloud SQL Server compare with Microsoft’s own offering, SQL Database running on Azure?

Peter Marriott has

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Full circle for Microsoft database APIs as OLEDB for SQL Server is deprecated

Microsoft’s Eric Nelson has posted about how the OLEDB driver for SQL Server is being deprecated and will not be supported beyond “Denali”, the forthcoming version.

OLEDB was created to be the successor to ODBC – expanding the supported data sources/models to include things other than relational databases. Notably OLEDB was tightly tied to a

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Easy database apps for iPad and iPhone with FileMaker Pro and Go

FileMaker Pro is a database manager from FileMaker Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Apple. It is a capable produce that has been around for over 20 years and is the dominant Mac-based database manager, though there is also a Windows version. FileMaker has evolved relatively slowly, with more focus on usability than on features.

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Hands On with Visual Studio LightSwitch – but what is it for?

Visual Studio LightSwitch, currently in public beta, is Microsoft’s most intriguing development tool for years. It is, I think, widely misunderstood, or not understood; but there is some brilliant work lurking underneath it. That does not mean it will succeed. The difficulty Microsoft is having in positioning it, together with inevitable version one limitations, may

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Microsoft’s code-first Entity Framework 4.1 nearly done

Microsoft has announced the release candidate of Entity Framework 4.1, the data persistence library for .NET, with a go-live licence. The final release to the web is expected in around one month’s time.

The big new feature is code-first, where you do not need to define a database schema or even a database model. You

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Why Oracle is immoveable in the Enterprise

At Oracle OpenWorld yesterday I spoke to an attendee from a global enterprise. His company is a big IBM customer and would like to standardise on DB2. To some extent it does, but there is still around 30% Oracle and significant usage of Microsoft SQL Server. Why three database platforms when they would prefer to

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Visual Studio LightSwitch – model-driven architecture for the mainstream?

I had a chat with Jay Schmelzer and  Doug Seven from the Visual Studio LightSwitch team. I asked about the release date – no news yet.

What else? Well, Schmelzer and Seven had read my earlier blog post so we discussed some of the things I speculated about. Windows Phone 7? Won’t be in the

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