UK job stats show Java decline

Long-time readers of this blog may recall that I occasionally track IT job vacancies at Jobserve. There may be better sites to track; but it carries a lot of vacancies, and I need to be consistent. I started in early 2002 with the goal of seeing how much adoption Microsoft was winning for its .NET technology. In March 2002, there were 153 vacancies which mentioned C#, versus 2092 for Java.

Since then, C# has grown steadily. Today it overtook Java for the first time (in my random and infrequent visits). There are 2206 C# vacancies, 2066 Java.

I also noticed that the absolute number of vacancies has declined substantially since my last visit, but Java by more than C#. The economy, I guess.

Is Microsoft really sweeping all before it? Well, no. Vista has disappointed; Apple sales grow ever higher; Netcraft’s web server survey shows a decline in the percentage of IIS sites on the Internet in September 2008 and observes that 75% of new web sites coming online use Apache. So it is a matter of what statistic you want to pick. Nevertheless, there is clearly still a lot of C# development out there.

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2 comments to UK job stats show Java decline

  • Clyde Davies

    I also noticed that the absolute number of vacancies has declined substantially since my last visit, but Java by more than C#. The economy, I guess.

    Perhaps it has something to do with the kinds of businesses that use these tools? Java = internet business; C# = line-of-business application. An economic downturn is more likely to clobber the former more heavily than the latter.

  • Yes or perhaps coupled with the fact that web 2.0 ajax frameworks offer developers the ability to create and easily deploy rich UI experiences/apps akin to applets of old so java for some time has been the domain of server based apps running on a black box, kind of negates the ‘write once run anywhere’ mantra (which was never fully realised). Applets even now are still a major pain on wide scale deployments.