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The case of the disappearing Azure AD application registration

Some time ago I wrote a simple web application which runs on Microsoft Azure and uses Azure Active Directory for authentication. The application is used constantly and has proved reliable; however yesterday it stopped working. A quick debug session showed that the problem was an Azure AD permissions error.

In order to use Azure AD, applications have to be registered in the Azure management portal. I use the old portal for this; I am not sure that the functionality exists in the new portal yet. There is a nice how-to here.

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One of the elements in the registration is a key which has a maximum lifetime of 2 years:

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My application was deployed about two years ago so I went to the portal to see if it had expired.

What I found surprised me. The application was not listed at all. It had disappeared.

Instead of simply obtaining a new key and updating my application config, I had to create a new application registration and update several keys in the config, which was an annoyance.

There is a wider point here, in the whole category of dealing with “things that expire”. Some time ago, Microsoft suffered an extended Azure outage because of an expired certificate. It is a shame that Microsoft insists on a maximum 2 year lifetime for this key but does not provide a check box for “alert me when this key is about to expire”, how difficult would that be?

Problems like this also mean that things which “just work” may not continue to do so. Of course a well organised enterprise setup can deal with this type of problem, but imagine, for example, the case of a small business with an application running on Azure where the developers have gone out of business, perhaps, or are no longer available. In fact the only code I needed to change was in web.config, but I can imagine it could take some time to figure out what to do and what to change.

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  4. Microsoft integrates Azure websites with hybrid cloud
  5. The new Windows Azure: a better cloud platform from Microsoft

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