Tag Archives: asp.net mvc

Book review: Professional ASP.NET MVC 5. Is this the way to learn ASP.NET MVC?

This book caught my eye because while I like ASP.NET MVC, Microsoft’s modern web application framework, it seems to be badly documented. Even the word “badly” is not quite right; there is lots of documentation, some of high quality, but finding your way around it is challenging, thanks to the many different pieces involved. When I completed an ASP.NET MVC project recently, I found it frustrating thanks to over-reliance on sample projects (hey, here is a an application we did that works, see if you can figure out how we did it), many out of date articles relating to old versions; and the opposite, posts and samples which include preview software that does not seem wise to use in production.


In my experience ASP.NET MVC is both cleaner and faster than ASP.NET Web Forms, the older .NET web framework, but there is more to learn before you can go ahead and write an application.

Professional ASP.NET MVC 5 gives you nearly 600 pages on the subject. It is aimed at a broad readership: the introduction states:

Professional ASP.NET MVC 5 is designed to teach ASP.NET MVC, from a beginner level through advanced topics.

Perhaps that is too broad, though the idea is that the first six chapters (about 150 pages) cover the basics, and that the later chapters are more advanced, so if you are not a beginner you can start at chapter 7.

The main author is Jon Galloway who is a Technical Evangelist at Microsoft. The other authors are Brad Wilson, formerly at Microsoft and now at CenturyLink Cloud; K Scott Allen at OdeToCode, David Matson who is on the ASP.NET MVC team at Microsoft, and Phil Haack formerly at Microsoft and now at GitHub. I get the impression that Haack wrote several chapters in an earlier edition of the book, but did not work directly on this one; Galloway brought his chapters up to date.

Be in no doubt: there are plenty of well-informed ASP.NET MVC people on this team.

The earlier part of the book uses a sample Music Store application, a version of which is publicly available here. You can also download a tutorial, based on the sample, written by Galloway. The public tutorial however dates from 2011 and is based on ASP.NET MVC 3 and Visual Studio 2010. The book uses Visual Studio 2013.

Chapters 1 to 6, the beginner section, do a decent job of talking you through how to build a first application. There are chapters on Controllers, Views, Models, Forms and HTML Helpers, and finally Data Annotations and Validation. It’s a good basic introduction but if you are like me you will come out with many questions, like what is an ActionResult (the type of most Controller methods)? You have to wait until chapter 16 for a full description.

Chapter 7 is on Membership, Authorization and Security. That is too much for one chapter. It is mostly on security, and inadequate on membership. One of my disappointments with this book is that Azure Active Directory hardly gets a mention; yet to my mind integration of web applications with Office 365 (which uses Azure AD) is a huge feature for Microsoft.

On security though, this is a useful chapter, with handy coverage of Cross-Site Request Forgery and other common vulnerabilities.

Next comes a chapter on AJAX with a little bit on JQuery, client-side validation, and Ajax ActionLinks. Here is the dilemma though. Does it make sense to cover JQuery in detail, when this very popular open source library is widely documented elsewhere? On the other hand, does it make sense not to cover JQuery in detail, when it is usually a vital part of your ASP.NET MVC application?

I would add that this title is poor on design aspects of a web application. That said, I was not expecting much on the design side; but what would help would be coverage of how to work with designers: what is safe to hand over to designers, and how does a typical designer/developer workflow play out with ASP.NET MVC?

I would also like to see more coverage of how to work with Bootstrap, the CSS framework which is integrated with ASP.NET MVC 5 in Visual Studio. I found it a challenge, for example, to discover the best way to change the default fonts and colours used, which is rather basic.

Chapter 9 is on routing, dry but essential background. Chapter 10 on NuGet, the Visual Studio package manager, and a good chapter given how important NuGet now is for most Visual Studio work.

Incidentally, many of the samples for the book can be installed via NuGet. It’s not completely obvious how to do this. I found the best way is to go to http://www.nuget.org and search for Wrox.ProMvc5 – here is the link to the search results. This lists all the packages available; note the package names. Then open the Nuget package manager console and type:

install-package [packagename]

to get the sample.

Chapter 11 is a too-brief chapter on the Web API. I would like to see more on this, maybe even walking through a complete application with clients for say, Windows Phone and a web application – though the following chapter does present a client example using AngularJS.

Chapter 13 is a somewhat theoretical look at dependency injection and inversion of control; handy as Microsoft developers talk a lot about this.

Next comes a very brief introduction to unit testing, intended I think only as a starting point.

For me, the the next two chapters are the most valuable. Chapter 15 concerns extending MVC: you learn about extending models with value providers and model binders; validating models; writing HTML helpers and Razor (the view engine in ASP.NET MVC) helpers; authentication filters and authorization filters. Chapter 16 on advanced topics looks in more detail at Razor, routing, templates, ActionResult and a few other things.

Finally, we get a look at how the Nuget.org application was put together, and an appendix covering some miscellaneous details like what is new in ASP.NET MVC 5.1.


I find this one hard to summarise. There is too much missing to give this an unreserved recommendation. I would like more on topics including ASP.NET Identity, Azure AD integration, Entity Framework, Bootstrap, and more. Trying to cover every developer from beginner to advanced is too much; removing some of the introductory material would have left more room for the more interesting sections. The book is also rather weighted towards theory rather than hands-on coding. At some points it felt more like an explanation from the ASP.NET MVC team on “why we did it this way”, than a developer tutorial.

That said, having those insights from the team is valuable in itself. As someone who has only recently engaged with ASP.NET MVC in a real application, I did find the book useful and will come back to some of those explanations in future.

Looking at what else is available, it seems to me that there is a shortage of books on this subject and that a “what you need to know” title aimed at professional developers would be widely welcomed. It would pay Microsoft to sponsor it, since my sense is that some developers stick with ASP.NET Web Forms not because it is better, but because it is more approachable.


Notes from the field: putting Azure Blob storage into practice

I rashly agreed to create a small web application that uploads files into Azure storage. Azure Blob storage is Microsoft’s equivalent to Amazon’s S3 (Simple Storage Service), a cloud service for storing files of up to 200GB.

File upload performance can be an issue, though if you want to test how fast your application can go, try it from an Azure VM: performance is fantastic, as you would expect from an Azure to Azure connection in the same region.

I am using ASP.NET MVC and thought a sample like this official one, Uploading large files using ASP.NET Web API and Azure Blob Storage, would be all I needed. It is a start, but the method used only works for small files. What it does is:

1. Receive a file via HTTP Post.

2. Once the file has been received by the web server, calls CloudBlob.UploadFile to upload the file to Azure blob storage.

What’s the problem? Leaving aside the fact that CloudBlob is deprecated (you are meant to use CloudBlockBlob), there are obvious problems with files that are more than a few MB in size. The expectation today is that users see some sort of progress bar when uploading, and a well-written application will be resistant to brief connection breaks. Many users have asynchronous internet connections (such as ADSL) with slow upload; large files will take a long time and something can easily go wrong. The sample is not resilient at all.

Another issue is that web servers do not appreciate receiving huge files in one operation. Imagine you are uploading the ISO for a DVD, perhaps a 3GB file. The simple approach of posting the file and having the web server upload it to Azure blob storage introduces obvious strain and probably will not work, even if you do mess around with maxRequestLength and maxAllowedContentLength in ASP.NET and IIS. I would not mind so much if the sample were not called “Uploading large files”; the author perhaps has a different idea of what is a large file.

Worth noting too that one developer hit a bug with blobs greater than 5.5MB when uploaded over HTTPS, which most real-world businesses will require.

What then are you meant to do? The correct approach, as far as I can tell, is to send your large files in small chunks called blocks. These are uploaded to Azure using CloudBlockBlob.PutBlock. You identify each block with an ID string, and when all the blocks are uploaded, called CloudBlockBlob.PutBlockList with a list of IDs in the correct order.

This is the approach taken by Suprotim Agarwal in his example of uploading big files, which works and is a great deal better than the Microsoft sample. It even has a progress bar and some retry logic. I tried this approach, with a few tweaks. Using a 35MB file, I got about 80 KB/s with my ADSL broadband, a bit worse than the performance I usually get with FTP.

Can performance be improved? I wondered what benefit you get from uploading blocks in parallel. Azure Storage does not mind what order the blocks are uploaded. I adapted Agarwal’s sample to use multiple AJAX calls each uploading a block, experimenting with up to 8 simultaneous uploads from the browser.

The initial results were disappointing. Eventually I figured out that I was not actually achieving parallel uploads at all. The reason is that the application uses ASP.NET session state, and IIS will block multiple connections in the same session unless you mark your ASP.NET MVC controller class  with the SessionStateBehavior.ReadOnly attribute.

I fixed that, and now I do get multiple parallel uploads. Performance improved to around 105 KB/s, worthwhile though not dramatic.

What about using a Windows desktop application to upload large files? I was surprised to find little improvement. But can parallel uploading help here too? The answer is that it should happen anyway, handled by the .NET client library, according to this document:

If you are writing a block blob that is no more than 64 MB in size, you can upload it in its entirety with a single write operation. Storage clients default to a 32 MB maximum single block upload, settable using the SingleBlobUploadThresholdInBytes property. When a block blob upload is larger than the value in this property, storage clients break the file into blocks. You can set the number of threads used to upload the blocks in parallel using the ParallelOperationThreadCount property.

It sounds as if there is little advantage in writing your own chunking code, except that if you just call the UploadFromFile or UploadFromStream methods of CloudBlockBlob, you do not get any progress notification event (though you can get a retry notification from an OperationContext object passed to the method). Therefore I looked around for a sample using parallel uploads, and found this one from Microsoft MVP Tyler Doerksen, using C#’s Parallel.For.

Be warned: it does not work! Doerksen’s approach is to upload the entire file into memory (not great, but not as bad as on a web server), send it in chunks using CloudBlockBlob.PutBlock, adding the block ID to a collection at the same time, and then to call CloudBlockBlob.PutBlockList. The reason it does not work is that the order of the loops in Parallel.For is indeterminate, so the block IDs are unlikely to be in the right order.

I fixed this, it tested OK, and then I decided to further improve it by reading each chunk from the file within the loop, rather than loading the entire file into memory. I then puzzled over why my code was broken. The files uploaded, but they were corrupt. I worked it out. In the following code, fs is a FileStream object:

fs.Position = x * blockLength;
bytesread = fs.Read(chunk, 0, currentLength);

Spot the problem? Since fs is a variable declared outside the loop, other threads were setting its position during the read operation, with random results. I fixed it like this:

lock (fs)
fs.Position = x * blockLength;
bytesread = fs.Read(chunk, 0, currentLength);

and the file corruption disappeared.

I am not sure why, but the manually coded parallel uploads seem to slightly but not dramatically improve performance, to around 100-105 KB/s, almost exactly what my ASP.NET MVC application achieves over my broadband connection.


There is another approach worth mentioning. It is possible to bypass the web server and upload directly from the browser to Azure storage. To do this, you need to allow cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) as explained here. You also need to issue a Shared Access Signature, a temporary key that allows read-write access to Azure storage. A guy called Blair Chen seems to have this all figured out, as you can see from his Azure speed test and jazure JavaScript library, which makes it easy to upload a blob from the browser.

I was contemplating going that route, but it seems that performance is no better (judging by the Test Upload Big Files section of Chen’s speed test), so I should probably be content with the parallel JavaScript upload solution, which avoids fiddling with CORS.

Overall, has my experience with the Blob storage API been good? I have not found any issues with the service itself so far, but the documentation and samples could be better. This page should be the jumping off point for all you need to know for a basic application like mine, but I did not find it easy to find good samples or documentation for what I thought would be a common scenario, uploading large files with ASP.NET MVC.

Update: since writing this post I have come across this post by Rob Gillen which addresses the performance issue in detail (and links to working Parallel.For code); however I suspect that since the post is four years old the conclusions are no longer valid, because of improvements to the Azure storage client library.

Telerik releases Kendo UI components for ASP.NET MVC

Component vendor Telerik has released an updated version of Kendo UI, its HTML5 framework. This is the first non-beta release with support for ASP.NET MVC server wrappers, with components including Grid, ListView, calendar and date controls, tree view, menu, editor and more. Kendo UI supports the MVVM (Model View ViewModel) pattern popular with Microsoft developers.



Telerik seems to be treading a careful path, maintaining its strong links to the .NET developer community while also creating a framework that can be used on other platforms.

I spoke to Todd Anglin, VP of HTML5 tools. Why the support for ASP.NET MVC – is Telerik seeing this becoming more popular than Web Forms, the older ASP.NET approach to web applications?

“Something in the range of 70% of ASP.NET developers are on web forms. We do see a bit of a trend that as they start new projects, developers are adopting ASP.NET MVC and HTML5, which is where it makes sense to use Kendo UI,” he told me.

The main reason though is that Kendo UI is less suitable for Web Forms, where more of the client-side code is generated by the framework. “Web Forms are a very high level abstraction,” said Anglin. “With MVC developers are a little closer to the metal.”

That said, he is not ruling out a Web Form wrapper for Kendo UI long-term.

Anglin says Kendo UI’s use of JQuery is a distinctive feature.  “Over the last few years JQuery has clearly risen above the pack to be the most common core Javascript library and the one most developers are familiar with. Unlike most commercial libraries out there Kendo UI chooses the JQuery core as the starting point and builds on that, so developers that adopt Kendo UI have a smoother on-ramp.”

Kendo UI supports both mobile and desktop web applications, but with different controls. “We believe that developers should offer experiences that are tailored to each device class, which is why you have Kendo UI web for keyboard and mouse, and Kendo UI mobile with a mobile-specific interface. We share code behind that, like the data source, between web and mobile, but we don’t think the interface on a mobile device should be the same as you show on a desktop browser,” said Anglin.

What about the tools side? Although Anglin says “We want to be agnostic on tools”, there is particularly good support for Visual Studion. “Kendo UI integrates with anything that supports HTML and JavaScript well, which includes the latest version of Visual Studio. We are delivering full vsdoc support for Visual Studio so that developers in that environment get Intellisense for JavaScript. But if you’re on a Mac you can use other tools,” he told me.

More interesting is a forthcoming cloud IDE. “We’ve just revealed a new tool called Icenium which is a cloud-based development environment for creating apps in HTML and JavaScript. It’s an incredible environment for building apps with Kendo UI.”

How about HTML5 apps that target the Windows Runtime (Metro) in Windows 8 – will Kendo UI work there? Apparently not:

“It’s certainly something we’ve paid attention to. Telerik’s primary position for Windows 8 runtime and Windows 8 development is with the traditional .NET targeted tools. Our RAD tools later this year will focus on introducing XAML and HTML tools for Windows Runtime. The HTML tools that we introduce will have a shared engineering core with Kendo UI, but we’ll make a tool that is specifically targeted at that runtime.

“Kendo UI is really focused on the cross-platform, cross-browser experience. You write once, at a core code level, and then use all the runtimes out there for HTML and JavaScript. Whereas Windows Runtime is leveraging familiar technology in HTML and JavaScript, but when you write a Windows Runtime app you are writing Windows software. It’s very platform-specific.”